"Rewards are worth the Risk: Working in Direct Dark Matter Detection" by Kimberly Palladino (U. W-Madison)

Date: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Series: 
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium

Thursdays, 4:00-5:00 pm

 

1-434 Physics and Astronomy (map)
Reception from 3:30-4:00 p.m.
(unless otherwise posted)

 

Guest Speaker:

Kimberly Palladino (University of Wisconsin - Madison)

Talk Title:  “Rewards are worth the Risk: Working in Direct Dark Matter Detection”

Abstract:

For particle physicists, determining the nature of Dark Matter is one of the greatest open mysteries. An abundance of astrophysical evidence indicates that the matter density of the universe is dominated by a new form of matter, which played a key role in growth of large scale structure. One candidate for Dark Matter is the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). We hope to detect WIMPS by seeing them scattering off of the target materials in our detectors. Liquid xenon has proved itself an excellent target, and LZ is a dual-phase TPC that will begin taking science data in 2020.  Much of the originally proposed parameter space for WIMPS has been excluded over the past few decades, so I will also delve into the sociology of working on direct dark matter searches.

For more information, contact Jay Hauser

We thank the following people for their contributions to the wine fund for the post-colloquium reception:
Prof. Dolores Bozovic, Prof. Robijn Bruinsma, Prof. Wesley Campbell, Prof. Bob Cousins, Prof. Jay Hauser, Prof. Eric Hudson, Robert Huff, Prof. HongWen Jiang, Prof. Alex Kusenko, Prof. John Miao, Prof. George Morales, Prof. Pietro Musumeci, Prof. Christoph Niemann, Prof. Rene Ong, Prof. James Rosenzweig, Prof. David Saltzberg, Prof. Jean Turner, and Prof. Gary Williams.

Location: 
1-434 PAB